Black in America

Black in America

By Kennisha L. Crawford

Kennisha L. Crawford is an American writer and poet. Kennisha has written for various different online publications such as Society19, Blasting News and Uloop.


Today I saw a young black kid, who had to be no more than about 13 or 14, get patted down by the police. I watched the entire time this young man got pat down because I wanted to make sure that no injustice happened to him. As if civilian me could somehow stop two law enforcement officers from doing wrong. Luckily, the young kid was handled properly, and the officers let him go. I don’t know exactly what the situation was that prompted the officers to search the kid but, I was just happy that the incident didn’t turn brutal or deadly. 

Being black in America, has always been a challenge, simply based off our dark complexions. In these pasts few years however, it feels like there is an undercover plot to make us extinct. Now, that may sound harsh but all you would have to do is turn on the news or log into any of your social media accounts, and you will see undisputable proof that black people are being killed at an insanely high rate in the most injustice scenarios. 

What has made the rise in killings of black people extremely gut-wrenching is that a good amount of them have come from the servitude hands of the police. The hands that are supposed to protect the innocent but as of lately, have been the legally cold murderers of the innocent. It would appear that if your skin is not porcelain white, you are automatically found guilty and your judgement can most likely end with you not breathing anymore. 

The topic of police injustice killings of black people has been one that has been talked about ceaselessly. There have been endless movements, rallies, marches, press coverage and even apparel made, to showcase that we, black people, will not be silent nor go unheard as we are gunned down in the streets, parks and sidewalks like cattle. But even with our glorious cries and unity, we are still being unheard and unseen by those who possess the power to help change the course of the societal injustices we black people face daily. 

Black men especially, whether young or old, are faced with an extreme risk of never returning home if confronted by the police. Think of the stories of Tamar Rice, Mike Brown, Alton Sterling, Eric Garner and Philando Castile, who all were unarmed and innocent, yet still were killed by the police in their cities. And though all were innocent, NOT ONE of the men who were responsible for killing them, were convicted for their crime. This is what happens when you are black; even when you are innocent and wrongly killed, there is a very high probability that “justice” will not be served for you. 

I am just thankful that at least at this moment, there is one young black boy who will make it home. 

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